Home / Investments / Protocol-backed investment accounts are a paradigm shift

Protocol-backed investment accounts are a paradigm shift

Blockchain’s version of retail investment accounts can improve yields, remove the middleman, and enable public services.

Jake Brukhman

Read and subscribe to these articles on Substack.

The coming to market of “challenger banks” like N26 and Revolut, modern savings products like Goldman’s Marcus, and finance apps like M1Finance, suggests that personal finance is repositioning as generationally minded mobile applications and web apps. But blockchain’s decentralized finance version of banking and investments is not merely the next iteration of tech challengers, it is a paradigm shift.

In the near future, many interactions with blockchains will simply look like an investment account to the end user.

In the near future, many interactions with blockchains will simply look like an investment account to the end user. Activities like providing security to a public blockchain or liquidity to a financial protocol will be available in “investment account format” — just deposit any amount of dough, take some risk, and earn a return. The innovative part of this scheme is that depositing capital into the supply side of decentralized protocols is crucial for their successful operation. Just imagine if every American deposited $100 into an account for Ethereum 2.0 staking — Ethereum would have the power of an extra $32.7 billion (~1.5x current market cap) in network security, and the user can earn up to 10.3% in Ether-denominated return.

With products like M1 Finance, Millennials can borrow money from their mobile apps today.

Though currently more risky, could protocols begin to stand in for traditional investment accounts over time? This past year, the market’s highest yielding savings account by Wealthfront clocked in at 2.53% APR, accepted investments as lows a $1, and lowered costs through technological automation. Similar products from Goldman Sachs, Ally, and others are popular in the market, with customers focused on higher rates of return and Millennials under increased pressure to save 40% of their paycheck. At the same time, Charles Schwab, TD Ameritrade, and other brokerages have found themselves cutting trading fees to 0 as customers in a digital world now value transaction facilitation less than advice and other services.

Imagine if every American deposited $100 into an account for Ethereum 2.0 staking — Ethereum would have the power of an extra $32.7 billion in network security, and the user can earn up to 10.3% in Ether-denominated return.

Given how quickly tech products are penetrating personal finance, traditional savings accounts seem woefully out of date. In traditional savings, the customer makes a deposit into the fractional-reserve banking system. A bank takes the capital and uses it to make proprietary investments — notably, lending — which produce a rate of return. A small fraction of the return is shared with the customer. Drawbacks of this system include that customers can neither practically opt out of fractional-reserve banking, nor mitigate the counterparty risk of the bank without invoking expensive federal regulation and insurance. Returns for customers are dictated by providers, diluted by the need for shareholder profits, and don’t go far enough to counteract the consumer’s exposure to inflation. All in all, the scope, function, and performance of the traditional savings account leaves much to be desired in our modern context.


Source link

Check Also

Biden Enters the White House: What Does this Mean for Crypto in the US?

Now that the day of the inauguration of President-elect Joseph R. Biden has arrived, a ...

Leave a Comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *